security clearance denied

#1

I started working for DON on an interim secret security clearance. 2 years later a SOR was issued due to financial reasons. I begin working for another agency within DOD and the position required a NACI. The SOR came back denied just before I started in the new position. I’m just curious as to whether denial of an secret clearance will hinder me in the near future for job opportunities.

#2

It will most likely hinder you from many opportunities with the government. Yes. Your goal needs to be to address the financial issues. You might have to look at private industry for employment while you do that. Did you appeal the SOR? Are the issues mitigatable under the AG?

#3

Oh ok. I begin working for Department of Army the beginning of March. This job requires a NACI. So I assume I passed the interim for the NACI. So I just want to make sure once the NACI is completed, what are the chances of it being denied? I didn’t appeal the SOR since I was leaving. Should I have appealed? If so, is it too late? I’m working on paying the debts and will have written notices of all payment arrangements and receipts of debts paid in full.

#4

If you didn’t appeal your SOR, you don’t have a clearance and you will have to self-report the denial on any future clearance applications.

NACI is a different issue with which I am not terribly familiar. I will leave that to someone else.

#5

I think she is referring to her National Agency Checks. If any clearance investigation checks the available systems they would see a denial. Leaving one not appealed…will show as a denial and it requires as Ed said reporting on the SF86. If it isn’t…it appears that info is being concealed. Sometimes folks interchangeably refer to a BI and NAC’s as one in the same. They are not. Secret clearances are usually NACS. A TS requires a full blown BI, formerly referred to as an SSBI, now they use a tier system to refer to these levels. Likely that changes again with the new named CI investigative program. .

#6

Yes that’s correct. I’m referring to National Agency Check with Inquiries. My current position requires I have a NACI to continue employment. I’m just curious as to whether my denial of a secret clearance position will hinder me in the future and more so, in my current job. I’ve been at my current position for almost a month and is still waiting on computer access. I’m just worried my past clearance info will have a negative effect on me in my job.

#7

Normally getting denied somewhere, results in a loss of clearance elsewhere. But there are exceptions to the rule. If it was your company declining to submit you then it isn’t a denial. I would certainly appeal the denial. Are you at liberty to describe the reasons on the Statement of reasons?

#8

I have a considerable amount of debt that I wasn’t able to pay off until recently (which I’m still paying off) My previous job was with DON and the deadline is passed to request an appeal.

#9

I don’t know about the NACI but I you might be alright there. It’s not a “clearance” so the requirements are less severe. As for future jobs, whenever you apply for a clearance, you will now have to put that you were denied on your SF86. However, if you fix the problems that caused the denial, you will have a good chance of clearing.

1 Like
#10

See this forum: What if a current federal employee fails a clearance?

You should ask your security officer if your case has been fully adjudicated. I imagine that it takes some time for you to be fully adjudicated, but I am not too sure about that. I don’t think you are out of the wood yet.

Anyway, the denial might have impact on your current public trust position. I am not sure if this is reportable with public trust positions as I don’t think there is a requirement in general as do national security positions; nonetheless, the Army requires this to be reported regardless of position designation. I would advise you to proactively consult with a clearance attorney and/or security officer. By reporting, it might have a consequence for you… but that would be better than having the Army finding out.

Also, with the denial… you will not be able to apply for a national security position with the Navy for a year. I imagine that other DoD agencies will probably say the same. This is why we should always respond to SOR and appeal the decision.

#11

Ok. Thank you for that info. Since I didn’t appeal the decision initialy, is it too late to appeal? Is their a timeframe?