What are my chances post grad?

I’m looking to apply for a position that requires a TS clearance once I finish law school and I was wondering what my chances of approval would be with the following disclosures.

-dual citizen (US and Canada) much of my family lives in Canada so they would technically be foreign contacts
-used marijuana maybe 4-5 times in college
-split a xanax with my friend 1 time over 4 years ago
-went skinny dipping with a few people at my friends beach house. (it was at 3 in the morning and the beach was empty but still illegal)
-And finally the one I am most concerned about. I am prescribed adderall for ADD, my doctor recommended I try not to take it every day so I didn’t. this led to me having a few extra pills lying around at the end of the month. about 4 or 5 times one of my roomates asked me if he could have the extra pills i had left over and I said sure stupidly not realizing that i was technically distributing drugs. Once I realized how I had ■■■■■■ up I told my roomates in no uncertain terms that i would never give them any again and to never ask me which they didn’t. That was about 3 years ago do I have any chance??

In the nicest way possible, no. Although somewhat minimal, you have shown a pattern of illegal activity.

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The great irony here is you’re in law school.

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I have to say, I don’t think I’ve come across skinny dipping in my interviews yet. Lol.

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I’ve had skinny dipping and streaking cases. One streaking case was amusing as the campus police were the arresting agency and the school was a moderate sized private religious college.

Everyone knew about the incident… and yes, it involved alcohol and togas.

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True although all of these incidents happened during my undergrad and high school years i have not taken part in any sort of illicit activity since then

With that being said do i have a chance or could i have a chance if i waited a little longer?

It was a stupid decision i made as an 18 year old but everyone here says not to hide anything so i’m telling all

Lol well at least i’m not alone. Based on your experience if these events happens years ago do i have a chance?

no one can really guess. The adjudicator that reads the whole report is the only one that can truly say yes or no.

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Thanks for taking the time to reply man I truly appreciate it. I’m thinking of just getting an a job that doesn’t require a clearance and then applying after more time has passed if i wait until my early thirties it will have been over 10 years since any reportable behavior on my part. Would i have a good chance then? Thanks again man

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I appreciate the response i’m now thinking of spending some time in a non clearance job i’m thinking i can get 10 years time since i did anything Inappropriate and still apply in my early 30’s

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I believe the dual citizen issue is the real issue. The other stuff is pretty small beans in the big picture. It’s illegal to be married to two women. I don’t know how someone can pledge allegiance to two countries. It’s allowed but i believe quite problematic for anyone wanting access to national security information.

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Dual citizen is only really an issue with higher risk countries, which Canada is not. Frankly this all sounds like stuff I come across pretty frequently in interviews. Except the skinny dipping lol. I don’t think you’d have to list that unless you got arrested or something.

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Dual citizenship is not an issue but takes longer. The allowing a friend to take your Adderall is the tough one. But time mitigates a lot. I would wait a minimum of 3 to 5 years. I would say no real chance clearing right now. After 3 years 20 to 30%. After 5 years…50%. After 7 years with a life well lived, not hanging out with those previously sharing drugs…75 to 85% and by 10 plus years, 95%. Young dumb and stupid covers a lot of sins, time really helps.

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I imagine the dual citizenship concern would be a “bigger” issue at, say, ICE, as compared to the VA.

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Don’t get down from the negative Nellys here. In my many years of experience the person worried about getting a clearance need not worry much if at all. Be truthful and contrite and try to mitigate these issues as best as possible. Don’t be a Chatty Cathy as a lot of honest and conscientious people are want to do. In explicating reasons, in explicating really anything, brevity is key. Less is more.

When I was an contract investigator (~dozen years after Fed employment) the average issue-laden case was worse than yours if not much worse (felonies, major financial delinquency, work place threats, misuse of info systems, online Chinese girlfriend, etc.). Skinny dipping at 3 AM on an empty beach? Seriously?? It’s a background investigation not a confessional. (Nb: the average American commits ~3 federal felonies per day: L. Gordon Crovitz: You Commit Three Felonies a Day - WSJ).

You were in college/law school when you did this stuff. Trust me, every adjudicator knows that in our modern era this is a period of maturation and experimentation (i.e., stupidity). That said, a subject (applicant) will often have an understandable reason for “misuse of an Rx drug” (e.g., big exam, finals, school work, etc.). Doesn’t condone but makes it relatable.

Fortunately for you adjudicators are smart, understanding, and have pretty much seen it all. I think your chances are good for getting the clearance if you’re honest, straightforward, contrite and promise to go and sin no more.

Be positive and good luck!

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