570+ days since eQip SF86 for TS SCI/ when long is too long?

Hello,
By posting here I hope to make some sense to my current wait time. It’s been more than 570 days since I submitted eQip SF86 for TS SCI for a contract position with an agency. Naturalized citizen born in one of the former Soviet republics (now it’s independent from RU) have been living here for more than 20 years with no criminal record, no drug use, some financial troubles that has been addressed. Every year left the country for no more than 3 weeks to visit a sick relative (who used to serve in RU military and now deceased). All travels was reported to and followed up by the agency.
Time line:
Applied Aug’18
CJO Nov '18
eQip Nov '18
Poly Dec '18
Credit pulled Feb '19
PSI Feb '19
Few follow ups + one is suppose to be scheduled but got postponed due to Covid19.
Just how much longer could I possibly wait… Any suggestions? Advice? Should I contact my state rep? Or it’s “normal” considering my biographical factors. Thank you.

At first I thought you were applying for a direct hire position but then I reread your post and I see this is for a contractor job. In my experience it is unusual for contractors to even bother with hiring such folks since it can take so long. I’m glad to see that is not always the case.

Unfortunately timelines like this are not unheard of for people in your situation. 570 days is less than two years and just on this board alone we’ve had reports of up to three years.

Hi,
Thank you for your reply. According to your layout I’m not an exception and it gives me hope for possible positive outcome. It’s a linguist position that requires to be hired as contractor with possible full time later.

Hey, welcome to the club! I’m direct hire 780+ days since CJO. Naturalized citizen born in well known US ally in Asia (not former Soviet/not Islamic). Here’s my take on your situation:

The fact that you’ve been polygraphed seems to be good news. Try to find out if your file is in adjudication or if you’re still in suitability. Have you had a psych test yet? The follow ups seem to be good news as well, I didn’t even know that they did that as my application has been completely neglected after my BI interview eons ago.

Your connections to the Former Soviet Union will be looked into/scrutinized but if you’re origins are in a country that now enjoys good relations with the US and is a country associated with Caucasian/white people you’ll probably be okay in the end. If you’re origins are in a country with some sort of Islamic bent you might be in for a bad time.

State reps are hit/miss. I sent one in a long while back. They are lame ducks who usually send me an email every month saying they’re contacting the agency and waiting for a response. Put one in and see what happens, some people have found good luck. Hope this helps!

This statement has no basis. How did you ever come to this conclusion? Do you now understand why your 780+ days and still not cleared?

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" I reread your post and I see this is for a contractor job. In my experience it is unusual for contractors to even bother with hiring such folks since it can take so long. "

Hey @sbusquirrel, who are these “such folks”? I think I’m one of them, also from the former Soviet Union, naturalized citizen, currently being processed by a contractor for TS/SCI. I guess we happen.
@GenerationX I think I know which agency you are going for, I went through similar process as a linguist.

I have met quite a few people who were born in the former USSR (even when it was still the USSR) who got hired as government employees… it took a while for them to get cleared, but it seems like the government is willing to wait. Most of my experience was with engineering contractors. I guess it is different if the company is trying to hire linguists.

It seems to be true. There’s an inherent distrust of people of certain backgrounds. Some of it makes sense but when you see several people who have more extensive travel history or other major flags it does make you question how equitable the process really is. Again, this is just one of many perspectives.

*several people with more problematic backgrounds clear in half the time you’ve been processing for it does raise questions. By problematic I mean financial issues, travel to questionable foreign countries, extensive drug/alcohol use. A common denominator amongst those who take a long time is origins in certain ethnic groups. I’m far from the first person to make this observation.

With due respect to all,
I think a native speaker is a different ball game for any agency and they don’t mind to go extra mile and hire qualified native speaker. Native speakers are not just translators they catch all nuances of the language, you can tell the mood of a speaker by how he/she chooses wording.

I think we’re processing for different agencies but same level of clearance. I speak critical languages as well so I can understand where you’re coming from. Your agency seems somewhat proactive unlike mine…

Your point about native speakers is 100% correct, I hope that those who are in charge of these matters understand that. Most immigrants or first gen’s like myself (and hopefully you) are more loyal and appreciative to the US and our core values than a lot of ungrateful college students and other millennials I’ve seen.

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It has nothing to do with questioning their loyalty more than others, it is more a concern that people with close ties to their countries of origin will be more vulnerable to targeting and recruiting by foreign intelligence services. Also it is nearly impossible to conduct any vetting in most foreign countries.

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Once again this is false, please stop saying this. You dont even work for the agency and are not privvy to the hiring process nor security clearance process. What is the actual percentage of people from certain ethnic groups that are being delayed? I understand that it is a frustrating process but please do not continue to spread this misinformation.

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@velcroTech my apologies, i am not trying to spread misinformation and I see where your coming from. Which is why I said that I’m just speaking from one perspective. I am not an expert nor am I claiming to be one.

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Also it is nearly impossible to conduct any vetting in most foreign countries.
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I guess this well explains 570+ days of waiting.

I’m currently at 520 days of waiting since SF86 submission for TS/SCI. I had a polygraph scheduled in March after my background investigation was complete and passed, but the polygraph was cancelled due to covid19. Not sure when they will start doing polygraphs again, but that’s the last thing I have left before adjudication.

The list of 15-30 “red flag” foreign countries that cause more scrutiny during an investigation are across the spectrum of race, religion, and geography and can change year to year. Covid is speeding some things up but definitely slowing a lot more things down overall. Large swaths of federal employees have been sitting home for months doing nothing.

Hmm… isn’t a polygraph should be preceding the BI, or it’s another one??

Different agencies schedule subject interviews and polys in different orders

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The wait is officially over! Almost 2 years after the clearance is granted!!

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