In-laws don't want to provide information

So I’m completing my eqip and i get to section 18, my wife’s parents don’t want to disclose their information what do I do? they are born in Mexico but are both permanent residents with social security numbers and all.

If you’re married, you have to provide in-laws’ information. In-laws don’t get a say because it’s not their security questionnaire.

When turning in the SF86 to an FSO they always review it first before submitting to the customer…this is where the ‘suitability’ usually comes in to play when you hear people complain about it. In this instance make it clear you have in-laws that arent providing the required information and let the FSO handle it from there - and by that I mean they will advise you the best course of action or contact the Customer and get direction from them.

Do not put false information or no information - contact the FSO before proceeding. Always better to ask than assume.

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List what you know and disclaim what you do not.

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thank you for your help my fro Sid it was fine just enter the information I have and denote that they did not want to disclose further information.

You think the secret police are going to show up and force the in-laws to give their personal information to the Subject? If they don’t want to provide their DOB, POB, residency info etc to the Subject, they don’t have to. This is still a free country the last time I checked . . . .

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Hope you’re not being adjudicated by a DHS component.

They can find the information via other methods, e.g. Lexis Nexis. So long as he has a name, phone number, or address, the SFO can get all the information they refuse to provide.

I don’t know where you live, but in America one does NOT have to provide information without a court order.

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South America? North?

Nothing else needs to be said……SMH

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It always amuses me when people want a clearance but don’t want to provide all of the requested information on the questionnaire in order to be adjudicated to possibly obtain the clearance.

I once had a subject tell me they could not provide their in-laws’ information because their in-laws “are sleeping.” Or dead. Or they don’t know (ask your spouse).

Not a good enough excuse.

If you’re married, you’ve got in-laws. Period.

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Hi I’ve watched your responses to my post, and none of them were particularly helpful. What amuses me is the assumptions you’ve made at no point did I say I didn’t have in-laws I asked what to do if they refuse to give me THEIR INFORMATION, you are incorrect I can not make them give it to me, yes it is MY security clearance questionnaire not theirs so they aren’t obligated to tell me anything, my post was made because I did not know what to in this case as I just got married earlier this year so this was a first. My FSO just told me to put the info they did give me and put placeholders in for the Info they didn’t give me and to put in comments explaining they would not disclose certain information. Not everyone is trying to game the system or be less then honest so I would kindly appreciate if you would keep your negative comments to yourself as they add nothing to this conversation.

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Good thing you’re NOT an adjudicator. Honestly, you shouldn’t be doing investigations with that attitude.

If someone REFUSES to provide information, there is NOTHING anyone can do. PERIOD.

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If you report this on your questionnaire, the government will want to verify the information. They will definitely want to verify if your in-laws are in fact LPRs.

If you don’t report it, the government will find out (because your in-laws already gave the government their information to become LPRs) and you’ll have to explain why you did not list your in-laws.

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The OP puts what he knows on the forms and adds a comment to explain missing information. Why you are making this process so difficult is ridiculous.

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No, they won’t. You’re spreading misinformation. The clearance is on him not his family.

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I listed them I just did not know what to put for the information they wouldn’t give me. I’ve been completely honest with the security office and because I already have a clearance she said it wouldn’t be an issue. The government had enough info to look up whatever they need.

It always amuses me when people want a clearance but don’t want to provide all of the requested information on the questionnaire in order to be adjudicated to possibly obtain the clearance.

It’s not that the OP didn’t want to provide the information. They tried to obtain the information from their in-laws, but they were non-compliant.

What is adjudicated?