EAP Reportable?


#1

How does EAP affect clearance? An incident occured last year on the first week of my federal job. I was held at gunpoint, beat up and robbed in the town I resided. They took my phone and wallet. My supervisor found out due to the obvious bruising on my face when coming into the office the following morning. He told me about EAP and said they are there to talk to me if I needed to vent. I decided to go for sleep advice as I hardly slept. I went for advising once for 3 weeks until I was sleeping a full 8 hours a day.

The form states do not disclose if it was strictly martial, grief not related to voilence by you or PTSD. Would this be under grief and therefore not reportable? Because I submitted my SF86 prior to hire this event is not listed (yet).


#2

I would say that you could easily not report this . . . It could easily be mitigated under the PTSD heading. Even if they decided that it should have been reported, your explanation should satisfy.

Since you are currently employed and your supervisor suggested the use of the therapist, you can simply report this to your FSO and get a written or digital statement that you disclosed it.

Don’t be paranoid . . . Nobody is going to strip you of your clearance because you were mugged.


#3

I’ll go speak with my FSO right now to get it in writing that I spoke to them about this matter. Thank you!

Edit: FSO said because I wasn’t the one doing harm/mugging another and using EAP for my own well being, it is not reportable.

Hope this helps other victims in the future. Dont be afraid of EAP, get help so you can ensure your duties.


#4

Thanks for the update . . . But, I would tell everyone not to fear therapy in general if you feel it’s justified. Get help when you need it. The problem, more often than not, with clearance holders is the subject that gets you into therapy not the therapy itself. People need help dealing with loss, spouse issues, children issues, parent issues and others. Clearance holders are not special in that these things do not happen to the them. We have a special responsibility to deal with these issues and sometimes therapy is the way to get this done.

Over the last several years, I have read a number of books on PTSD treatments in the military and every book discuss the difficulty of getting our soldiers to admit that they need the help. Let’s not have that be a problem here . . .


#5

Good call! That was definitely ill advice on my part. What about getting help regarding ADHD? I have some coworkers who think they have it but are afraid to consult a doctor because they would rather not report it on their SF86 as a ding for mental health. What is your take on this? (Cant find info on here or anywhere)


#6

You don’t want to get me started on ADHD . . . If you have coworkers who think that they are ADHD my best suggestion would be to get their rear ends into a gym. ADHD is not a mental issue. It’s a medical issue.


#7

I have not yet to speak with them today but since hired, I noticed they frequently go to the gym almost everyday (morning or afterhours at the gym on site). I dont mean to poke but what about ADHD or ADD which you were referring to? Im not well educated about ADHD/ADD and so Im sorry if it upset you.


#8

You didn’t upset me . . . ADHD is a farce . . . It’s a catch-all diagnosis used to medicate kids with too much energy or with other behavioral issues that should be treated instead. The meds are dangerous and cause more problems than they create.

Nobody should be self-diagnosing ADHD/ADD . . .